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stunningpicture:

I like the way you think, Coke.

stunningpicture:

I like the way you think, Coke.

To be, …OR NAH?
William Shakespeare (via ora-le)
weed-wizard-420-blaze-it:

Deal. With. It.
~Maxi

weed-wizard-420-blaze-it:

Deal. With. It.

~Maxi

toonami-underground:

Hyper Active Combo

toonami-underground:

Hyper Active Combo

keepita-secrett:

0liii:

vaginacore:

lipstick-lesbian:

thattwatdeziree:

deafeningechoes:

lunabriluna:

cartelgathering:

kwills88:

I have like the weirdest boner right now.

This is so much better than that “kissing strangers for the first time” video

I love this

this is fucking amazing

i love this

"look behind you"

"NO"

Sense títol, per a sistema plurifònic i làmpara de Xenó,
Un concert d’EVOL, Bacelona, 2012 
Sense títol, per a sistema plurifònic i làmpara de Xenó, Un concert d’EVOL, Bacelona, 2012 

nubbsgalore:

photos of sakurajima, the most active volcano in japan, by (click pic) takehito miyatake (previously featured) and martin rietze. volcanic storms can rival the intensity of massive supercell thunderstorms, but the source of the charge responsible for this phenomenon remains hotly debated.

in the kind of storm clouds that generate conventional lightning, ice particles and soft hail collide, building up positive and negative charges, respectively. they separate into layers, and the charge builds up until the electric field is high enough to trigger lightning.

but the specific mechanism by which particles of differing charges are separated in the ash cloud is still unknown. lightning has been observed between the eruption plume and the volcano right at the start of an eruption, suggesting that there are processes that occur inside the volcano to lead to charge separation.  

volcanic lightning could yield clues about the earth’s geological past, and could answer questions about the beginning of life on our planet. volcanic lightning could have been the essential spark that converted water, hydrogen, ammonia, and methane molecules present on a primeval earth into amino acids, the building blocks of life.

(see also: previous volcanology posts)

So Metal

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Incredible Graphite Illustrations by Monica Lee

Malaysian artist Monica Lee draws amazingly photo-realistic images with graphite pencils.

Read More

bpod-mrc:

09 July 2014
Messaging Machinery
Inside the human brain, billions of neurons [nerve cells] communicate in an intricate network. To do this, they rely on chemical messengers, known as neurotransmitters, which propagate signals between cells across chemical synapses. Released by one cell, these molecules bind to specific receptors on a receiving neuron to transmit the signal. Pictured is a 3D representation of a synaptic bouton, the cellular compartment responsible for packaging neurotransmitters into membrane sacks, or vesicles, and exporting them out of the cell. Using microscopy and mass spectrometry, researchers have drawn up a detailed picture of this compartment. They identified 300,000 proteins found within the area, 60 of which are depicted in different colours in this diagram – the red tubes represent tubulin filaments, giving structure to the cell, while the white circles are vesicles. Providing new insights into neurotransmitter release, this study offers a tantalising glimpse into the exquisite complexity of the brain’s signalling machinery.
Written by Emmanuelle Briolat
—
Image by Silvio Rizzoli and colleagues University of Göttingen Medical Center, GermanyCopyright held by The American Association for the Advancement of ScienceResearch published in Science, May 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

09 July 2014

Messaging Machinery

Inside the human brain, billions of neurons [nerve cells] communicate in an intricate network. To do this, they rely on chemical messengers, known as neurotransmitters, which propagate signals between cells across chemical synapses. Released by one cell, these molecules bind to specific receptors on a receiving neuron to transmit the signal. Pictured is a 3D representation of a synaptic bouton, the cellular compartment responsible for packaging neurotransmitters into membrane sacks, or vesicles, and exporting them out of the cell. Using microscopy and mass spectrometry, researchers have drawn up a detailed picture of this compartment. They identified 300,000 proteins found within the area, 60 of which are depicted in different colours in this diagram – the red tubes represent tubulin filaments, giving structure to the cell, while the white circles are vesicles. Providing new insights into neurotransmitter release, this study offers a tantalising glimpse into the exquisite complexity of the brain’s signalling machinery.

Written by Emmanuelle Briolat

Image by Silvio Rizzoli and colleagues
University of Göttingen Medical Center, Germany
Copyright held by The American Association for the Advancement of Science
Research published in Science, May 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

aniki-tony:

Bringing the Pro-pain

aniki-tony:

Bringing the Pro-pain